Opinion on a Project for Removing the Obstructions to a Ship Navigation to Georgetown, Col

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W. Cooper, printer, 1812 - Potomac River - 40 pages
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Page iii - The report of the committee of the House of Representatives, to whom was referred the Governor's message on the subject of free schools, concurred in this view.
Page 154 - To renew Iht charge, book must be brought to the desk. DATE DUE...
Page 21 - Is it possible to improve the natural bed of any liver, which is subject to freshes that bring down alluvium from the upper country, so as to prevent the deposition of that alluvium in the form of bars, at the place at which the rapidity of the current is repelled, slackened, or annihilated, by the flood tides, or by its expansion...
Page 21 - Baltic, they have . never succeeded in one single instance to effect a permanent channel through a natural bar, but have always done permanent injury, where they have even effected a temporary good.
Page 22 - ... full work until the Spanish army retreated through the mines before .the patriots, and) on their retreat broke the engines, and threw them into the engine pits. For a report of my progress in Peru, see the first number of the Geological transactions of Cornwall, copied from the Lima Gazettes. In reply to the questions put to me by the committee of the House of Commons, respecting the probable process of steam power for locomotive purposes, I beg to say, on railroads, they have been proved to...
Page 14 - In the Potomac, on the contrary, the effect of the flood as' a current ceases at the bar, and this very circumstance alone, has caused the bar to be deposited where it \s now lodged.
Page 17 - ... increase the evil, by creating a hole at their mouth, and for some distance below, and heaving up a bar beyond it.
Page 17 - I have, and having, after my arrival in England, in 1785, and during 9 years residence in that country, had the benefit of the instruction.of Mr. Smeaton, and of his experience, and also of my own, especially at Maldon and Rye...

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