Syntax

Front Cover
James Parker, 1866 - Greek language
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 335 - TMESIS IN COMPOUND VERBS. I. As prepositions are properly mere local adverbs, the older dialects, which commonly used them as such, would naturally place the preposition apart from the verb, in many cases where the Attics always used the compound ; and even where Homer employs the compound in the same sense as the single verb, we are not to suppose an actual tmesis wherever we find the verb and the preposition used instead of the compound ; for Homer would use both the old...
Page 142 - ... circumstances of external things ; and as the relations in which these things stand to us in respect of their position were too manifold to be sufficiently defined by the simple powers of the cases, it happened that, as men examined into and comprehended the position of external things, some farther mode of expression became necessary, and cases of certain words, which, from their original meaning, were fitted for the expression of these relations, were so frequently used to express them, that...
Page 142 - But though a relation which was implied in the powers of the original eases might be, and generally was, for the sake of clearness, expressed by a preposition, yet it does not follow that the original power of the cases to express this relation was either in theory or practice wholly lost ; so that we find the same relation expressed sometimes by the original, more concise...
Page 629 - Xenophon represent, public speech 1 Jelf (following Kiihner) rightly classes Thucydides with those writers who, " engrossed with the subject, were overpowered by their flow of thought, and endeavouring to concentrate these notions in all their fulness in as few words as possible, passed from thought to thought, without taking much care that the several parts of the whole sentence should be connected together with a strict grammatical accuracy.
Page 581 - ... of expression that it is meant to speak of the thing as having really happened. This mode of putting the actual in the place of the conditional realization is emphatic, and gives a notion of the certainty of the consequent, if the restriction contained in the apodosis had not intervened. Compare Liu., xxxiv., 29 : " EC difficiltor facta erat oppugnatio, ni T. Quinctius supervenisset ;" ana Нот., Od., ii., 17, 27 : " Me truncus illapsus cerebro sustulerat, nisi Faunus ictum dextrd levasset.
Page 48 - Obs. 1. — When the antecedents are of different persons, the first person is preferred to the second, and the second to the third ; as, "John, and thou, and I, are attached to our country." — "John and thou are attached to your country.
Page 630 - ... endeavouring to concentrate these notions in all their fulness in as few words as possible, passed from thought to thought, without taking much care that the several parts of the whole sentence should be connected together with a strict grammatical accuracy." The constructions of Thucydides, he adds, " in spite of, or perhaps because of, their grammatical inaccuracy, have a power and depth of expression which perhaps no other prose writer ever attained.
Page 25 - As the passive notion of receiving from another became more defined, the form whereby it was already expressed still represented it in most of the tenses ; while for its more accurate definition in past and future time, fresh forms were quickly invented, partly from the middle, partly from the active. So the Sclavonic language has no passive, but uses the reflexive; and the Sanscrit...
Page 143 - Ihe thing as a patient, the Greeks used an intransitive verb with the genitive of the thing as an agent, representing the action of the verb as proceeding from it. So, where in German the verb hören, to hear, has an accusative, the Greeks used the genitive. In their view, the object entered the mind rather as the antecedent cause than as the coincident effect ; but in some verbs, either the former principle prevailed altogether, or sometimes ; so that we find particular verbs with an accusative,...
Page 369 - Such an inf. is used in the place of an 'tmpenit,. to express a command, or wish, that the person addressed would himself do something. It depends on a verb of wishing, or desiring, in the speaker's mind, and can stand only for the second person sing, or plur.

Bibliographic information