The Private Journal of F.S. Larpent ...: Attached to the Head-quarters of Lord Wellington During the Peninsular War, from 1812 to Its Close, Volume 1

Front Cover
R. Bentley, 1853 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 105 - Lord Aylmer gave me two striking instances of Lord Wellington's coolness : one, when in a fog in the morning, as he was pursuing the French, he found a division of our men, under Sir William Erskine, much exposed in advance, and nearly separated from the rest of the army, and the French in a village within a mile of where he was standing. He could see nothing. But, on some prisoners being brought in, and being...
Page 106 - Erskine, much exposed in advance, and nearly separated from the rest of the army, and the French in a village within a mile of where he was standing. He could see nothing. But, on some prisoners being brought in, and being asked what French division, and how many men were in the village, they, to the dismay of every one except Wellington, said that the whole French army were there. All he said was, quite coolly : " Oh ! they are all there, are they? Well, we must mind a little what we are about,...
Page 131 - The following is very delightful. It is characteristic both of poor Craufurd and the Duke. " I have heard a number of anecdotes of General Craufurd. He was very clever and knowing in his profession all admit, and led on his division on the day of his death in the most gallant style ; but Lord Wellington never knew what he would do. . . . On one occasion he remained across a river by himself —that is, only with his own division, nearly a whole day after he was called in by Lord Wellington. He said...
Page 83 - He hunts almost every other day, and then makes up for it by great diligence and instant decision on the intermediate days. He works until about four o'clock, and then, for an hour or two, parades with any one whom he wants to talk to, up and down the little square of Frenada (amidst all the chattering Portuguese) in his grey great coat.
Page 131 - I am glad to see you safe, Craufurd." To which the latter replied, "Oh, I was in no danger, I assure you.
Page 108 - I take it in the army that the officers in the lower branches of the staff are sharp-set, hungry, and anxious to get on, and make the most of everything, and have a view even in their civilities. I have tried not to...
Page 54 - Wellington," he writes in December, " whom I saw every day for the last three or four days before he went " (he was off to Cadiz or " somewhere "), "I like much in business affairs. He is very ready and decisive, and civil — though some complain a little of him at times, and are much afraid of him. Going up with my charges and papers for instructions, I feel something like a boy going to school. I expect to have a long report to make on his return.
Page 277 - When he had given the instructions, he saw a cherry-tree, and went up to break a bough off and eat the cherries. When Lord Wellington lost his way the other night in the fog (returning to head-quarters), Fitzclarence told Lord Wellington he was sure the road was so-and-so, as they had passed the place where they found the two Portuguese companies. ' How do you know that,' quoth Lord Wellington, ' By that cherry-tree, which I was up just afterwards,
Page 82 - Yesterday I was pleased when he said, " If your friends knew what was going on here, they would think you had no sinecure. And how do you suppose 1 was plagued when I had to do it nearly all myself?" He seemed to feel relieved, and of course I could not but feel gratified. I can assure you, however, that we have none of us much idle time. Dr. M'Gregor has seven hundred medical men to look after. The...
Page 106 - I thought they meant to be off — very well ; ' and then another shave, just as before, and not another word till he was dressed.

Bibliographic information