Manners, Customs, Life and History of the People of China, Japan and Corea

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P.W. Ziegler & Company, 1897 - East Asia - 400 pages
 

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Page 249 - ... the uncivilized customs of former times should be broken through; and the impartiality and justice displayed in the workings of nature be adopted as a basis of action; and that intellect and learning should be sought for throughout the world, in order to establish the foundations of the empire.
Page 177 - The speech and the written composition of the Chinese differ more than those of any other people. The former addresses itself, like all other languages, to the mind through the ear ; the latter speaks to the mind through the eye, not as words but as symbols of ideas. All Chinese literature might be understood and translated though the student of it could not name a single character.
Page 122 - The salaries awarded are low out of all proportion to the necessary expenses pertaining to the offices to which they are apportioned, and the consequence is, that in some way or other the officials are compelled to make up the deficiency from the pockets of those subject to them. Every legal precaution is taken to prevent this nefarious system, with the exception of the only one which might be expected to put a stop to it. All appointments...
Page 122 - ... vindicated, and their accusers, of whatever rank, are brought to the bar of justice. Not long since, for an offence of this nature, the lieutenantgovernor of the province of Honan was dismissed from his office, and the governor was degraded three steps of rank for having countenanced the proceedings. As has been already said, the affairs of each province are administered by the viceroy or governor and his subordinates, and, speaking generally, their rule is as enlightened and as just as could...
Page 230 - For centuries the mention of that name would bate the breath, blanch the cheek, and smite with fear as with an earthquake shock. It was the synonym of sorcery, sedition, and all that was hostile to the purity of the home and the peace of society.
Page 343 - Legation at Peking, succeeded in obtaining an interview with a member of the Corean embassy, who told him that after the General Sherman got aground she careened over as the tide receded, and her crew landed to guard or float her. The native* gathered around them, and before long an altercation arose. A general attack began upon the foreigners, in which every man wağ killed by the mob. About twenty of the natives lost their lives. Dr. Williams...
Page 116 - ... people, and distinguished by some peculiar mark or color so as to keep up the impression of awe with which he is regarded, and which is so powerful an auxiliary to his throne. The...
Page 129 - English judge, but to have to look for mercy on the chance of the presiding mandarin being of a kindly disposition, is a poor security for those who enter a criminal court. It follows, as a natural consequence, that in a country where torture is thus resorted to the punishments inflicted on criminals must be proportionately cruel. Death, the final punishment, can unfortunately be inflicted in various ways, and a sliding scale of capital punishments is used by the Chinese to mark their sense of the...
Page 124 - Kwei-chow was put to death by strangulation for having levied an illegal assessment of 6,050 taels only from certain communes of the Meaou-tsze aborigines within his district. The immunity which some mandarins enjoy from the just consequences of their crimes, and the severity with which the law is vindicated in the cases of others for much lighter offences, has a sinister aspect. But in a system of which bribery and corruption practically form a part one need not expect to find purity in any direction,...
Page 240 - they will give us philosophical instruments, machinery, and other curiosities, will take ignorant people in, and trade being their chief object, they will manage bit by bit to impoverish the country ; after which they will treat us just as they like ; perhaps behave with the greatest rudeness and insult us, and end by swallowing up Japan. If we do not drive them away now, we shall never have another opportunity. If we now resort to a dilatory method of proceeding we shall regret it afterwards when...

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