The Cotton Mills of South Carolina, 1907: Letters Written to the News and Courier

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Daggett Printing Company, 1907 - Cotton growing - 228 pages
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Page 12 - Here will be found a never-failing asylum for the friendless orphans and the bereft widows, the distribution of labor and the improvements in machinery happily combining to call into profitable employment the tender services of those who have just sprung from the cradle, as well as those who are tottering to the grave, thus training up the little innocents to early and wholesome habits of honest industry, and smoothing the wrinkled front of decrepitude with the smiles of competency and protection.
Page 105 - SEC. 6. Any parent, guardian or person standing in loco parentis, who shall furnish to the persons named in section 4 of this act a certificate that their child or ward has attended school for not less than four months during the current school year, and that said child or children can read and write, may be permitted to obtain employment for such child or children in any of the textile establishments of this State during the months of June, July and August, and the employment of such child or children...
Page 104 - ... of 8 pm in order to make up lost time, which has occurred from some temporary shut down of the mill, on account of accident or breakdown in the machinery, which has caused loss of time...
Page 6 - When the true history of the cotton mills is written it will be found that South Carolina was probably the very first State to undertake the development of cotton manufacturing.
Page 19 - North, and shipped and sold at a profit. "10. There is also a small factory at Society Hill, owned by Col Williams, from which he supplies his own plantation, and those of the surrounding neighborhood, with a very superior article of cotton bagging. He also ships yarn to a Northern market. "11. There is, besides, an extensive establishment of this kind now in progress of construction near Charleston, from which we have reason to expect the best results, and several minor establishments in the back...
Page 10 - State, and it would be very advantageous to this State to have useful manufactories established in the same: "'I. Be it therefore enacted, by the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives, now met and sitting in General Assembly, and by the authority of the same. That a lottery shall be established and drawn, and finally concluded and completed, the profits whereof, after deducting the necessary expenses attending the same, shall be applied towards the promotion of useful manufactures in...
Page 19 - ... an enterprising, practical manufacturer from the North. In this factory we understand none but white operatives are employed, but we have not been informed of its success since it has fallen into the hands of its present lessee. For several years previous, under the management of M. Townsend, Esq., we believe it was doing well. The yarn manufactured at this establishment has been heretofore mostly contracted for at the North, and shipped and sold at a profit.* "10. There is also a small factory...
Page 11 - ... Legislature, to enable him to construct a spinning machine on the principles mentioned in a patent he holds from the United States, one thousand dollars.' "The records show that about 1809 there was a factory 'for making check goods, handkerchiefs at Charleston, which turned out some very pretty goods.' "1808 the homespun fad seems to have become acute, and the resolutions of the House of Representatives for that year show that at the June session a resolution was passed that all members of the...
Page 15 - MILL. that of Europe. We are well satisfied that whatever direction may be given to the capital and labor of the South, if it is successful, will be legislated upon for the advantage of the North without the slightest compunction for the injury it may bring us. This is the settled policy of the majority. In the meantime, however, we wish Gen.
Page 11 - ... 1789, John Curry, of the city of Charleston, has deposited in the Secretary's office a model of a machine for picking or ginning cotton. "Again, there is in the appropriation bill for 1809 a paragraph emphasizing the desire of this State to foster cotton manufactures. It reads : 'To Ephraim McBride, to be advanced to him on the conditions contained in a resolution of this branch of the Legislature, to enable him to construct a spinning machine on the principles mentioned in a patent he holds...

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