Napoleon's Last Voyages: Being the Diaries of Admiral Sir Thomas Ussher, R. N. K. C.B. (on Board the "Undaunted"), and John R. Glover, Secretary to Rear Admiral Cockburn (on Board the "Northumberland"). With Introduction of Notes, by J. Holland Rose

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T. Fisher Unwin, 1906 - 247 pages
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Page 36 - ... circumstances will permit, with every proper respect and attention to Napoleon, to whose secure asylum in that island it is the wish of his Royal Highness the Prince Regent to afford every facility and protection. ' Should you experience any interruption, either during your progress, or after your arrival, from any of His Majesty's officers by sea or land, you will explain to them the nature of the service with which you are entrusted, and that you are...
Page 78 - On proceeding a little farther we met two well-dressed young women, who saluted him with compliments. One of them, the youngest, told him with great ease and gaiety that she had been invited to the ball at Longone two days before, but as the Emperor did not attend it, as was expected, she had remained at home. Instead of returning by the same road, he turned off by goat-paths, to examine the coast, humming Italian airs, which he does very often, and seemed quite in spirits. He expressed his fondness...
Page 48 - Emperor along the gang-plank into the boat. The Undaunted lay close in, with her topsails hoisted, lying to. On arriving alongside, I immediately went up the side to receive the Emperor on the quarter-deck. He took his hat off and bowed to the officers, who were all assembled on the deck. Soon afterward he went forward to the forecastle among the people, and I found him there conversing with those among them who understood a little French.
Page 69 - Head, hoisted out all the boats, and sent some of the baggage on shore. At eight the Emperor asked me for a boat, as he intended to take a walk on the opposite side of the bay, and requested me to go with him. He wore a great-coat and a round hat. Comte Bertrand, Colonel Campbell, and Colonel Vincent (chief engineer) went with us ; Baron...
Page 188 - Poniatowski as worthy of such distinction), and to make the Emperor of Russia engage to join firmly in the Continental system against commercial intercourse of any sort with England, until its Government should be brought to agree to what he termed the
Page 44 - I slept this night at Frejus, and was awakened at four in the morning by two of the principal inhabitants, who came into my room to implore me to embark the Emperor as quickly as possible, intelligence having been received that the army of Italy, lately under the command of Eugene Beauharnais, was broken up; that the soldiers were entering France in large bodies, and were as devoted as ever to their chief. These gentlemen were afraid the Emperor might put himself at their head. I told them I had...
Page 31 - ... that might occur. Captain Napier and I then proceeded in the barge of the Euryalus toward the land. We found a dense crowd collected at the landing-place, who, as we stopped to inquire for the pratique officers, rushed into the water, and, seizing the bow of the boat, hauled me by main force on shore. Never did I witness such a scene as now presented itself, as, almost choked by the embraces of old and young, we were hoisted on their shoulders, and hurried along, we knew not whither. I certainly...
Page 45 - JHR and misgivings to the envoys, who, I dare say, were as little pleased as I was at being awakened at so unreasonable an hour. It was, indeed, pretty evident that Napoleon was in no hurry to quit the shores of France, and appeared to have some motive for remaining. The envoys became rather uneasy, and requested me to endeavour to prevail upon him to embark that day. In order to meet their wishes, I demanded an interview, and pointed out to the Emperor the uncertainty of winds, and the difficulty...
Page 81 - Schwarzenberg's army ; drove them before him a whole day, like sheep, at full gallop, took 1500 or 2000 prisoners, and some light pieces of artillery, but, to his surprise, did not see any army, and again halted. His best information led him to believe that they had returned to Troyes. Accordingly he marched in that direction, and then ascertained, after a loss of three days, that the armies of Schwarzenberg and Bliicher had marched upon Paris. He then ordered forced marches, and went forward himself...
Page 235 - Nothing can possibly be less prepossessing, nay, more horribly forbidding, than the first appearance of this isolated and apparently burntup barren rock, which promises neither refreshment nor pleasure. To this terrific and disgusting external appearance (causing a wonderful contrast) I attribute in a great measure the many flattering and flowery descriptions which have been published of the interior beauties of this island, none of which was...

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