Philosophy and Power in the Graeco-Roman World: Essays in Honour of Miriam Griffin

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Oxford University Press, 2002 - Philosophy - 348 pages
Miriam Griffin is unrivalled as a bridge-builder between historians of the Graeco-Roman world and students of its philosophies. This volume in her honour brings togetherseventeen international specialists. Their essays range from Socrates to late antiquity, extending to Diogenes, Cicero, Plinythe Elder, Marcus Aurelius, the Second Sophistic, Ulpian, Augustine, the Neoplatonist tradition, women philosophers, provision for basic human needs, the development of law, the formulation of imperial power, and the interpretation of Judaism and early Christianity. Emperors and drop-outs, mediastars and administrators, top politicians and abstruse professionals, even ordinary citizens in their epitaphs, were variously called philosophers. Philosophy could offer those in power moral support or confrontation, a language for making choices or an intellectual diversion, but they mightdisregard philosophy and get on with the exercise of power. 'Philosophy' means 'love of wisdom', but what was the power of philosophy?
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
13
Section 3
31
Section 4
51
Section 5
69
Section 6
91
Section 7
111
Section 8
133
Section 11
181
Section 12
193
Section 13
211
Section 14
229
Section 15
251
Section 16
271
Section 17
293
Section 18
307

Section 9
157
Section 10
173

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About the author (2002)


Gillian Clark is Professor of Ancient History, University of Bristol Tessa Rajak is Reader in Classics, University of Reading

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