The Collected Essays and Criticism, Volume 1: Perceptions and Judgments, 1939-1944

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University of Chicago Press, Feb 15, 1988 - Art - 296 pages
Clement Greenberg is widely recognized as the most influential and articulate champion of modernism during its American ascendency after World War II, the period largely covered by these highly acclaimed volumes of The Collected Essays and Criticism. Volume 3: Affirmations and Refusals presents Greenberg's writings from the period between 1950 and 1956, while Volume 4: Modernism with a Vengeance gathers essays and criticism of the years 1957 to 1969. The 120 works range from little-known pieces originally appearing Vogue and Harper's Bazaar to such celebrated essays as The Plight of Our Culture (1953), Modernist Painting (1960), and Post Painterly Abstraction (1964). Preserved in their original form, these writings allow readers to witness the development and direction of Greenberg's criticism, from his advocacy of abstract expressionism to his enthusiasm for color-field painting.With the inclusion of critical exchanges between Greenberg and F. R. Leavis, Fairfield Porter, Thomas B. Hess, Herbert Read, Max Kozloff, and Robert Goldwater, these volumes are essential sources in the ongoing debate over modern art.
 

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Clement Greenberg: the collected essays and criticism

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Greenberg is best known for his art reviews in The Nation and his essays in Partisan Review, especially the much-reprinted "Avant-Garde and Kitsch.'' The present volumes include over 200 essays as ... Read full review

Contents

1939
3
1940
22
An American View
38
Review of The Structure of
47
Review of Exhibitions of Joan Miro Fernand Leger
62
Review of New Poems 1940
74
Review of Metapolitics
79
Review of What Are Years? by Marianne Moore
85
Letter to the Editor of Politics
185
Obituary of Mondrian
187
Review of Great American Paintings by John Walker and Macgill James
189
Review of War Diary by Jean Malaquais
190
A Victorian Novel
193
Abstract Art
199
Review of an Exhibition of Arnold Friedman
204
Review of Exhibitions of Mark Tobey and Juan Gris
205

Review of Vlaminck by Klaus G Perls Paul Klee
93
Review of an Exhibition of Andre Masson
99
Review of The Emergence of
106
Review of The Seventh Cross by Anna Seghers
113
Review of Exhibitions of Pavel Tchelitchew John
124
Review of an Exhibition of Morris Graves
126
Review of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection
140
Review of Mondrians New York Boogie Woogie
153
49 Review of Exhibitions of Van Gogh and the Remarque Collection
160
Review of Exhibitions of Charles Burchfield Milton Avery and Eugene Berman
163
Review of Exhibitions of Marc Chagall Lionel Feininger and Jackson Pollock
164
Review of Exhibitions of Louis Eilshemius and Nicolas Mocharniuk
166
Review of Georges Seurat by John Rewald
167
Review of an Exhibition of John Marin
170
Review of the Whitney Annual and the Exhibition Romantic Painting in A merica
171
Review of an Exhibition of Andre Derain
175
A Symposium on American Literature and the Younger Generation of American Jews
176
Review of Napoleon III by Albert Guerard
179
The Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors and the Museum of Modern Art
182
Review of Men Women and Dogs by James Thurber
184
Review of The Story of Painting by Thomas Craven
206
Review of Exhibitions of Joan Miro and Andre Masson
207
Review of a Group Exhibition at the Art of This Century Gallery and of Exhibitions of Maria Martins and Luis Quintanilla
209
Review of The Bottomless Pit by Gustav Regler
211
A New Installation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and a Review of the Exhibition Art in Progress
212
Letters to His Son Lucien edited by John Rewald
214
A Discussion
217
Review of Two Exhibitions of Thomas Eakins
220
Review of Dangling Man by Saul Bellow
223
Surrealist Painting
225
Review of an Exhibition of Jose Guadaloupe Posada
231
Review of an Exhibition of Abraham Rattner
232
Review of French Impres sionists and Their Contemporaries prefaced by Edward Alden Jewell
233
Review of an Exhibition of Winslow Homer
235
Review of Art in the Armed Forces and Of Men and Battles by David Fredenthal and Richard Wilcox
239
Review of an Exhibition of Eugene Delacroix
241
Review of an Exhibition of John Tunnard
244
Review of Paul Klee Drawings by Will Grohmann and Masterpieces of Painting from the National Gallery of Art
245
Review of Two Exhibitions of Marsden Hartley
246
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About the author (1988)

Clement Greenberg (1909-1994), champion of abstract expressionism and modernism--of Pollock, Miró, and Matisse--has been esteemed by many as the greatest art critic of the second half of the twentieth century, and possibly the greatest art critic of all time. On radio and in print, Greenberg was the voice of "the new American painting," and a central figure in the postwar cultural history of the United States. Greenberg first established his reputation writing for the Partisan Review, which he joined as an editor in 1940. He became art critic fornbsp;The Nation in 1942, and was associate editor of Commentary from 1945 until 1957. His seminal essay, "Avant-Garde and Kitsch" set the terms for the ongoing debate about the relationship of modern high art to popular culture. Though many of his ideas have been challenged, Greenberg has influenced generations of critics, historians, and artists, and he remains influential to this day.

John O'Brian is professor of art history at the University of British Colombia.

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