Malinowski Among the Magi: The Natives of Mailu

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Psychology Press, 2001 - Social Science - 366 pages
A reissue of Malinowski's first field monograph, containing historical and theoretical material. This edition includes a major essay by Michael Young who draws on Malinowski's diary, unpublished notebooks and letters.
 

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Contents

Lessons of Experience
12
Field Notebooks and the Writing of Mailu
27
The Missionarys Mailu
43
Mailu Prehistory
58
The Natives of Mailu
77
Facsimile Page from Original Typescript
96
Page
100
Mailu problem The natives of Mailu or Toulon Island
107
Economics
209
Hunting
219
Transport and trading Introductory remarks Description
231
Forms of work General remarks Communal labour Sexual
253
Industries Introductory remarks Pottery Armshells
261
MagicoReligious Activities and Beliefs
269
Magic Black magic White magic apportioned to individuals
283
Death burial and mourning General remarks The mourners
322

Geography
113
Social Divisions
120
The dúbu clan and subclan Description of clan subclan
128
Tribal Life
150
Village life The seasons and their influence upon the social life
168
Sexual life and marriage Sexual life before marriage General
174
Children and their play Birth and infancy Childhood
191
Warfare and head hunting
204
Art and Knowledge
324
Knowledge Knowledge of stars and weather Knowledge
330
Editors Notes
332
References
340
Manuscript Sources
345
Index
346
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Bronislaw Malinowski, a Polish-born British anthropologist, was a major force in transforming nineteenth-century speculative anthropology into an observation-based science of humanity. His major interest was in the study of culture as a universal phenomenon and in the development of fieldwork techniques that would both describe one culture adequately and, at the same, time make systematic cross-cultural comparisons possible. He is considered to be the founder of the functional approach in the social sciences which involves studying not just what a cultural trait appears to be, but what it actually does for the functioning of society. Although he carried out extensive fieldwork in a number of cultures, he is most famous for his research among the Trobrianders, who live on a small island off the coast of New Guinea.

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