Man and Culture: An Evaluation of the Work of Bronislaw Malinowski

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Psychology Press, Nov 29, 2001 - Ethnology - 302 pages
This volume is a reassessment of Malinowski's work by a group of his former pupils and colleagues. A frank evaluation, not a eulogy, it examines the real and lasting importance of Malinowski's contribution to a range of subjects.
 

Contents

The Concept of Culture in Malinowskis Work
15
Malinowskis Theory of Needs
33
Malinowski and the Theory of Social Systems
53
Malinowskis Contribution to Fieldwork Methods and
71
Ethnographic Analysis and Language with Reference
93
The Epistemological Background to Malinowskis Empiricism
119
Malinowskis Theories of Law
139
Malinowski and the Study of Kinship
157
Malinowski on Magic and Religion
189
The Place of Malinowski in the History of Economic Anthro
209
Malinowski and the Study of Social Change
229
Anthropology as Public Service and Malinowskis Contribution
245
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
265
INDEX
285
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About the author (2001)

Bronislaw Malinowski, a Polish-born British anthropologist, was a major force in transforming nineteenth-century speculative anthropology into an observation-based science of humanity. His major interest was in the study of culture as a universal phenomenon and in the development of fieldwork techniques that would both describe one culture adequately and, at the same, time make systematic cross-cultural comparisons possible. He is considered to be the founder of the functional approach in the social sciences which involves studying not just what a cultural trait appears to be, but what it actually does for the functioning of society. Although he carried out extensive fieldwork in a number of cultures, he is most famous for his research among the Trobrianders, who live on a small island off the coast of New Guinea.

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