Urban Culture: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies, Volume 3

Front Cover
Chris Jenks
Taylor & Francis, 2004 - City and town life - 272 pages
This set includes key pieces from Peter Ackroyd, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, Homi Bhaba, Charles Dickens, Fredrick Engles, Paul Gilroy, Thomas Hobbes, Max Weber, George Simmel, Ian Sinclair, Edward W. Soja, Gayatri Spivak, Nigel Thrift, Virginia Woolf, Sharon Zukin, and many others.
The material is arranged thematically highlighting the variety of interests that coexist (and conflict) within the city. Issues such as gender, class, race, age and disability are covered along with urban experiences such as walking, politics & protest, governance, inclusion and exclusion. "Urban pathologies," including gangsters, mugging, and drug-dealing are also explored. Selections cover cities from around the globe, including London, Berlin, Paris, New York, Los Angeles, Rio de Janeiro, Bombay and Tokyo.
A general introduction by the editor reviews theoretical perspectives and provides a rationale for the collection.
This collection offers a valuable research tool to a broad range of disciplines, including: sociology; anthropology; cultural history; cultural geography; art critical theory; visual culture; literary studies; social policy and cultural studies.
 

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Contents

questions of ambivalence
3
PART
6
Extract from Two sides of antiracism
42
The stranger
73
The organization of territory
81
racism class and masculinity in the inner city
118
the expressway world
141
liminality carnivalesque
161
the sewer the gaze and the contaminating touch
193
Extracts from Situationist International Anthology
213
spatial tactics
236
Urban landscape and popular culture
249
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Transgression
Chris Jenks
No preview available - 2003
Transgression
Chris Jenks
No preview available - 2003
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About the author (2004)

Chris Jenks is Professor of Sociology and Head of Department at Goldsmiths College (U.K.).

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