The Freud Encyclopedia: Theory, Therapy, and Culture

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Taylor & Francis, 2002 - Psychology - 641 pages
The Freud Encyclopedia: Theory, Therapy, and Culture is a comprehensive reference work on the life, ideas, and influence of the great and controversial founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. The encyclopedia offers a wide range of articles on Freud and his work but also on Freud as a cultural and literary figure whose writings and ideas have, ironically, had a more lasting impact than his original psychoanalytic theories. Among the topics considered, for example, are Freud's influence on the creation and development of psychoanalytic theory as well as on art, literature, biography, history, cinema, religion, and sociology.
The encyclopedia also considers the many individuals who knew Freud personally, who studied under him and became his disciples (or his opponents), or who were instrumental in developing and advancing his ideas throughout the world. Such seminal figures as Carl Jung, Melanie Klein, Sandor Ferenczi, Anna Freud, and Ernest Jones are profiled, as are major precursors who anticipated many of Freud's ideas, such as Johann Herbart, Arthur Schopenhauer, and Friedrich Nietzsche.
Psychoanalysis originated in nineteenth-century Vienna, but after 1910, its influence was spread around the world by Freud's followers. Among the unique features of the encyclopedia are articles that examine the history and current state of psychoanalysis in some twenty-five countries on all the continents.
The Freud Encyclopedia: Theory, Therapy, and Culture is an invaluable resource for students and researchers in a wide variety of disciplines. The references at the end of each entry guide the reader to more detailed studies of the topic, and a comprehensive index serves as an access point to the many aspects of Freud's life and work that are covered in the book.
 

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The Freud encyclopedia: theory, therapy, and culture

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For this far-reaching reference, nine years in the making, Erwin (philosophy, Miami Univ.) assembled some 200 contributors to produce about 250 articles on Sigmund Freud's ideas, life, and influence ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Edward Erwin is professor of philosophy at the University of Miami at Coral Gables. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from The Johns Hopkins University in 1968. Professor Erwin is the author of The Concept of Meaninglessness (John Hopkins Press, 1970); Behavior Therapy: Scientific, Philosophical and Moral Foundations (Cambridge University Press, 1978); A Final Accounting: Philosophical and Empirical Issues in Freudian Psychology (M.I.T. Press, 1996); and Philosophy and Psychotherapy: Razing the Troubles of the Brain (Sage, 1997). He is also the co-editor (with Sidney Gendin and Lowell Kleiman) of Garland's Ethical Issues in Scientific Research (1994).

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