Film as Art

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University of California Press, 1957 - Performing Arts - 230 pages
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This book presents a theory of film. The greater part is an adaptation of the book originally published in 1933, long out of print but still in demand because it raises fundamental questions that the intervening years have by no means answered. Arnheim's provocative thesis is that the peculiar virtues of film as art derive from an exploitation of limitations of the medium: the absence of sound, the absence of color, the lack of three-dimensional depth. Silent-film artists made virtues of these necessities and were on their way to developing a new and distinctive art form. Mechanical advancement has led to greater realism, and a corresponding loss in artistry. The four essays which make up the rest of the book are supplementary in nature. The final one discusses the general aesthetic rules for the combination of different media--word, image, and sound--and leads to an evaluation of the talking picture as a medium for artistic expression.--Adapted from back cover.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
8
III
34
IV
134
V
154
VI
161
VII
181
VIII
188
IX
199
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About the author (1957)

Rudolf Arnheim is Professor Emeritus of the Psychology of Art at Harvard University. For many years he was a member of the Psychology Faculty at Sarah Lawrence College, and he spent his last ten academic years at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where he now lives.

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