The Norms of Nature: Studies in Hellenistic Ethics

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Malcolm Schofield, Gisela Striker
Cambridge University Press, 1986 - Philosophy - 287 pages
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Can moral philosophy alter our moral beliefs or our emotions? Does moral scepticism mean making up our own values, or does it leave us without moral commitments at all? Is it possible to find a basis for ethics in human nature? These are some of the main questions explored in this volume, which is devoted to the ethics of the Hellenistic schools of philosophy. Some of the leading scholars in the field have here taken a look at the bases of the Stoics' and Epicureans' thinking about what the Greeks took to be the central questions of philosophy. Their essays, which originated in a conference held at Bad Homburg in 1983, the third in a series of conferences on Hellenistic philosophy, propose important interpretations of the texts, and pose some fascinating problems about the different roles of argument and reason in ancient and modern moral philosophy. This book will be of interest to moral philosophers and to scholars of Greek philosophy too.

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About the author (1986)

Malcolm Schofield is Emeritus Professor of Ancient Philosophy, University of Cambridge and Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge. He is co-author (with G. S. Kirk and J. E. Raven) of the second edition of The Presocratic Philosophers (1983) and co-editor (with Keimpe Algra, Jonathan Barnes and Jaap Mansfeld) of The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy (1999). His other publications include An Essay on Anaxagoras (1980), The Stoic Idea of the City (1991; 2nd edition, 1999) and Plato: Political Philosophy (2006).

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