The Cambridge History of Islam: Volume 2A, The Indian Sub-Continent, South-East Asia, Africa and the Muslim West

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P. M. Holt, Ann K. S. Lambton, Bernard Lewis
Cambridge University Press, Apr 21, 1977 - History - 456 pages
First published in 1970, The Cambridge History of Islam is the most comprehensive and ambitious collaborative survey of Islamic history and civilization yet to appear in English. On publication it was welcomed as a work useful both for reference and reading, for the general reader, student and specialist alike. It has now been reprinted, with corrections, and for ease of handling the original two hardcover volumes have each been divided into two separate paperbacks.
 

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Contents

MUSLIM INDIA BEFORE THE MUGHALS
3
INDIA UNDER THE MUGHALS
35
APPENDIx
44
THE BREAKDown of TRADITIONAL society
67
INDIA AND PAKISTAN
97
SouTHEAST As IA I2 I
123
SOUTHEAST ASIAN ISLAM IN THE NINETEENTH
155
souTHEAST As IAN ISLAM IN THE Twent IETH
182
NORTH AFRICA TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
211
NORTH AFRICA IN THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVEN
238
NORTH A FRICA IN THE PERIOD OF COLONIZA
299
THE NILOTIC SUDAN
327
THE WESTERN AND CENTRAL SUDAN
345
THE IBERIAN PENINSULA AND SICILY
406
Ioa The Indian subcontinent in 1525 page 53
412
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About the author (1977)

Bernard Lewis was born in London, England on May 31, 1916. He graduated with honors in history from the School of Oriental Studies at the University of London in 1936 with special reference to the Middle East. In 1938, he was named an assistant lecturer at the University of London, where he received a Ph.D. the next year. In 1940, he was drafted into the British armed forces and assigned to the Army tank corps. He was soon transferred to intelligence. He taught at the University of London for 25 years. In 1974, he accepted joint appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey and Princeton University. He also taught at Cornell from 1984 to 1990. He became an American citizen in 1982. He was a scholar of Middle Eastern history and a prolific writer. His books included The Emergence of Modern Turkey, What Went Wrong?: The Clash between Islam and Modernity in the Middle East, and From Babel to Dragomans: Interpreting the Middle East. Because he was considered an expert on interactions between the Christian and Islamic worlds, his view helped shape American foreign policy under President George W. Bush. He died on May 19, 2018 at the age of 101.

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