The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 27, 1995 - Philosophy - 404 pages
Aristotle is one of the greatest thinkers in the Western tradition, but also one of the most difficult. The contributors to this volume do not attempt to disguise the nature of that difficulty, but at the same time they offer a clear exposition of the central philosophical concerns in his work. Approaches and methods vary and the volume editor has not imposed any single interpretation, but has rather allowed differences of interpretation to stand.
 

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DS 15

Contents

Life and work
1
Logic
27
Metaphysics
66
Philosophy of science
109
Psychology
168
Ethics
195
Politics
233
Rhetoric and poetics
259
Suggestions for reading
287
B Biography
301
LOGIC
308
Index of passages
385
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Jonathan Barnes has a BSc in Biological Sciences from the University of Sussex. He has been writing since the age of 21 and under a pseudonym has published four novels. He cam across the Bates method in 1983 and, as a wearer of glasses himself, decided to investigate it from a biologist's viewpoint. He found it logical and consistent, and since practising it has been able to improve his eyesight and discard his glasses.

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