Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture

Front Cover
Margreta de Grazia, Maureen Quilligan, Peter Stallybrass
Cambridge University Press, Feb 23, 1996 - Literary Collections - 398 pages
This collection of original essays brings together some of the most prominent figures in new historicist and cultural materialist approaches to the early modern period, and offers a new focus on the literature and culture of the Renaissance. Traditionally, Renaissance studies have concentrated on the human subject. The essays collected here bring objects - purses, clothes, tapestries, houses, maps, feathers, communion wafers, tools, pages, skulls - back into view. As a result, the much-vaunted early modern subject ceases to look autonomous and sovereign, but is instead caught up in a vast and uneven world of objects which he and she makes, owns, values, imagines, and represents. This book puts things back into relation with people; in the process, it elicits new critical readings, and new cultural configurations.
 

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Contents

The ideology of superfluous things King Lear as period piece
17
Rude mechanicals
43
Spensers domestic domain poetry property and the Early Modern subject
83
Materializations
131
Gendering the Crown
133
The unauthored 1539 volume in which is printed the Hecatomphile The Flowers of French Poetry and Other Soothing Things
166
Dematerializations textile and textual properties in Ovid Sandys and Spenser
189
Appropriations
211
Unlearning the Aztec cantares preliminaries to a postcolonial history
260
Fetishisms
287
Worn worlds clothes and identity on the Renaissance stage
289
The Countess of Pembrokes literal translation
321
Remnants of the sacred in Early Modern England
337
Objections
347
The insincerity of women
349
Desire is death
369

Freedom service and the trade in slaves the problem of labor in Paradise Lost
213
Feathers and flies Aphra Behn and the seventeenthcentury trade in exotica
235

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