The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt

Front Cover
Dana Villa, Cambridge University Press
Cambridge University Press, Nov 30, 2000 - Philosophy - 304 pages
Hannah Arendt was one of the foremost political thinkers of the twentieth century, and her particular interests have made her one of the most frequently cited thinkers of our time. This volume examines the primary themes of her multi-faceted work, from her theory of totalitarianism and her controversial idea of the 'banality of evil' to her classic studies of political action and her final reflections on judgment and the life of the mind. Each essay examines the political, philosophical, and historical concerns which shaped Arendt's thought.
 

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Contents

List of contributors
ix
List of abbreviations
xii
Chronology
xiii
the development of Arendts political thought
1
Arendts theory of totalitarianism a reassessment
25
Arendt and nationalism
44
Arendts Eichmann in Jerusalem
65
Arendt and the Holocaust
86
Athens and Rome
165
Equality and elitism in Arendt
178
Arendts constitutional politics
201
Arendt on revolution
220
Arendts theory of judgment
245
Arendt on philosophy and politics
261
Arendt on thinking
277
Select bibliography
293

Freedom the priority of the political
113
Political action its nature and advantages
130
Arendts Hellenism
151

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