Akira Kurosawa and Intertextual Cinema

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Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994 - Performing Arts - 265 pages
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In Akira Kurosawa and Intertextual Cinema, James Goodwin draws on contemporary theoretical and critical approaches to explore the Japanese director's use of a variety of texts to create films that are uniquely intertextual and intercultural. Surveying all of Kurosawa's films and examining six films in depth—The Idiot, The Lower Depths, Rashomon, Ikiru, Throne of Blood, and Ran—Goodwin finds in Kurosawa's themes and techniques the capacity to restructure perceptions of Western and Japanese cultures and to establish new meanings in each.

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Contents

Film Text the Intercultural Film Text
1
IA Life and Its Intertexts
26
Russian Intertexts
57
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

James Goodwin is a professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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