Mapping Benjamin: The Work of Art in the Digital Age

Front Cover
Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Michael Marrinan
Stanford University Press, 2003 - Performing Arts - 349 pages
Since its publication in 1936, Walter Benjamin’s “Artwork” essay has become a canonical text about the status and place of the fine arts in modern mass culture. Benjamin was especially concerned with the ability of new technologies—notably film, sound recording, and photography—to reproduce works of art in great number. Benjamin could not have foreseen the explosion of imagery and media that has occurred during the past fifty years.

Does Benjamin’s famous essay still speak to this new situation? That is the question posed by the editors of this book to a wide range of leading scholars and thinkers across a spectrum of disciplines in the humanities. The essays gathered here do not hazard a univocal reply to that question; rather they offer a rich, wide-ranging critique of Benjamin’s position that refracts and reflects contemporary thinking about the ethical, political, and aesthetic implications of life in the digital age.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

AURA DIRK BAECKER
9
HISTORY NORBERT BOLZ
24
TECHNOLOGY KARLHEINZ BARCK
39
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht is Albert Guérard Professor of Literature and Professor in the Departments of French and Italian, Comparative Literature, Modern Thought and Literature, and Spanish and Portuguese at Stanford University. Michael Marrinan is Associate Professor of Art History at Stanford University.

Bibliographic information