Myth and Religion in Mircea Eliade

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1998 - Religion - 375 pages
This multidisciplinary study is the first book devoted entirely to the critical interpretation of the writings of Mircea Eliade on myth. One of the most popular and influential historians and theorists of myth, Eliade argued that all myth is religious. Douglas Allen critically interprets Eliade's theories of religion, myth, and symbolism and analyses many of the controversial issues in Eliade's treatment of myth including whether Eliade's approach deals adequately with the relationship between myth and history and how Eliade's anti-modern perspective makes sense of myth in modern culture. A valuable resource for scholars in religious studies, philosophy, anthropology, and history, this book enables readers not only to understand "archaic" and "traditional" religious phenomena, but also to make sense of repressed and sublimated myth dimensions in modern secular life.
 

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Contents

Eliades Antireductionism
3
Reductionistic Critics and Eliade
27
The Dialectic of the Sacred
65
Nature Cosmos and Religious Bias
101
Symbolic Language and Structure
129
Characteristics and Functions of Symbolism
149
The Structure of Myth
179
Eliades Antihistorical Attitudes
211
The Primacy of Nonhistorical Structures
235
Camouflage of Sacred in Modern Profane
267
Cultural and Spiritual Renewal
291
Bibliography
333
Index
353
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Douglas Allen is Professor and Chair of the Philosophy department at the University of Maine. He is the author of Structure and Creativity in Religion (1978) and Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives (1997).

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