Fear and Trembling, and Repetition

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Robert L. Perkins
Mercer University Press, 1993 - Literary Criticism - 388 pages
For the first time in English the world community of scholars is systematically assembling and presenting the results of recent research in the vast literature of Soren Kierkegaard. Based on the definitive English edition of Kierkegaard's works by Princeton University Press, this series of commentaries addresses all the published texts of the influential Danish philosopher and theologian.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Faith as the Telos of Morality A Reading of Fear and Trembling
9
The Silencing of Philosophy
29
Art Deed and System
67
The Antithesis between the Religious View of Ethics and the Rationalistic View of Ethics in Fear and Trembling
101
The Parables of Problem III in Kierkegaards Fear and Trembling
127
Abrahams Silence Aesthetically Conceived
155
Whose Fear and Trembling?
177
Repetitions Repetitions
263
Understanding Imagination and Irony in Kierkegaards Repetition
283
Constantin Constantiuss Search for an Acceptable Way of Life
309
Notes on a Coach Horn Going FurtherRevocation and Repetition
335
The Magic of Theater Drama and Existence in Kierkegaards Repetition and Hesses Steppenwolf
359
Collation of Pages in the Hong and Hannay Translations of Fear and Trembling
379
In Memoriam
380
Notes on Contributors
381

Introduction
195
Kierkegaard Heidegger and the Foundering of Metaphysics
201
The Blissful Security of the Moment Recollection Repetition and Eternal Recurrence
225
Repetition A Story of Suffering
247
IKC Advisory Board
382
Index
383
Copyright

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Page 6 - So in the pseudonymous works there is not a single word which is mine, I have no opinion about these works except as a third person, no knowledge of their meaning except as a reader, not the remotest private relation to them, since such a thing is impossible in the case of a doubly reflected communication.
Page 5 - One statement at any rate I can make in regard to all who have written or who may write with a claim to knowledge of the subjects to which I devote myself — no matter how they pretend to have acquired it, whether from my instruction or from others or by their own discovery. Such writers can in my opinion have no real acquaintance with the subject. I certainly have composed no work...
Page 17 - Abraham's act is totally unrelated to the universal, is a purely private endeavor. Therefore, while the tragic hero is great because of his moral virtue, Abraham is great because of a purely personal virtue. There is no higher expression for the ethical in Abraham's life than that the father shall love the son. The ethical in the sense of the moral is entirely beside the point. Insofar as the universal was present, it was cryptically in Isaac, hidden, so to speak, in Isaac's loins, and must cry out...
Page 5 - Such writers can in my opinion have no real acquaintance with the subject. I certainly have composed no work in regard to it, nor shall I ever do so in future, for there is no way of putting it in words like other studies.

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