Notions of Nationalism

Front Cover
Sukumar Periwal
Central European University Press, Jan 1, 1995 - Political Science - 247 pages
In this highly topical volume, a group of distinguished scholars explore various aspects of nationalism theory and shed light on the current thinking in this area of great contemporary importance. Such topics as primordialism, institutional plurality in multi-ethnic states, historical problems of nationalism, and the importance of local-level understanding in dealing with such problems, are examined with clarity and vision. Together the essays provide a valuable insight into an intricate debate which is of crucial relevance to the understanding of contemporary politics not only in Central Europe but in the world at large.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Nationalisms Classified and Explained
8
Towards a Theory of Nationalism Consensus and Dissensus
34
A Political Theory of Nationalism and Its Excesses
44
National SelfDetermination from a Historical Perspective
65
Origins of the Constructivist Theory of the Nation
83
Intellectuals Ethnic Groups and Nations Two Latetwentiethcentury Cases
106
Breaking the Mould? Quebec Independence and Secession in the Developed West
129
Institutional Plurality Problem or Solution for the Multiethnic State?
162
Nations Nationalism and European Citizens
182
The Significance of Preconceptions Europe of Civil Societies and Europe of Nationalities
208
Conclusion
228
Index
241
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Page 14 - a force: that beggared all imagination. Suddenly war again became the business of the people — a people of thirty millions, all of whom considered themselves to be citizens ... The people became a participant in war; instead of governments and
Page 14 - as heretofore, the full weight of the nation was thrown into the balance. The resources and efforts now available for use surpassed all conventional limits: nothing now impeded the vigour with which war could be waged
Page 11 - Gellner is so anxious to show that nationalism masquerades under false pretences that he assimilates “invention” to “fabrication” and “falsity”, rather than to “imagining” and “creation”.
Page 11 - nationalism is not the awakening of nations to self-consciousness; it invents nations where they do not exist'.
Page 14 - a people of thirty millions, all of whom considered themselves to be citizens ... The people became a participant in war; instead of governments and

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