Nationalism After Communism: Lessons Learned

Front Cover
Alina Mungiu, Ivan Krastev
Central European University Press, Jan 1, 2004 - Political Science - 287 pages
Drawing on lessons from post-communist Europe, this book provides a summary of the practical wisdom learned in the management of ethnic conflicts from the Balkans to Chechnya. Grounded in empirical - mostly comparative - research, the essays go beyond theoretical postulates and normative ideals and acknowledge the considerable experience that exists within the post-communist world on ethnic conflict, nation and state building. What does the post-communist experience have in common with other nationalisms and nation-related conflicts, and what, if anything, is unique about it? This book, written by academics with experience as policy advisors, is strongly policy-oriented. The primordial type hypotheses of ethnic social capital and ancient hatreds are tested on the basis of public opinion surveys on nationalism and ethnic cohabitation in various countries in east-central Europe. Power-sharing arrangements in the Balkans, the small separatist Republics of the post-Soviet world as well as ethno-federalism from the former Yugoslavia to the former Soviet Empire are discussed in the respective chapters.
 

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Contents

Beyond System Paradigms in Research and Theory
13
THE SUBJECTIVE GROUNDS OF ETHNIC CONFLICT
41
Explaining Grassroots Nationalism in Postcommunist Europe
43
THE OBJECTIVE GROUNDS OF ETHNIC CONFLICT
81
The Case of Yugoslavia
83
Ahmetis Village or the Macedonian Case
101
Understanding Eurasias Unrecognized States
147
ASSESSING THE INSTITUTIONAL TOOLS
177
Is Ethnofederalism the Solution or the Problem?
179
National SelfDetermination and Postcommunist Popular Sovereignty
199
The Cases of Bosnia Macedonia and Kosovo
231
Electoral Systems and the Management of Ethnic Conflict in the Balkans
249
Nation and State Building after Communism
269
INDEX
283
Copyright

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Page 25 - Where the sentiment of nationality exists in any force, there is a prima facie case for uniting all the members of the nationality under the same government, and a government to themselves apart.
Page 16 - ... givens" — of social existence: immediate contiguity and kin connection mainly, but beyond them the givenness that stems from being born into a particular religious community, speaking a particular language, or even a dialect of a language, and following particular social practices. These congruities of blood, speech, custom, and so on, are seen to have an ineffable, and at times overpowering, coerciveness in and of themselves.
Page 16 - By a primordial attachment is meant one that stems from the 'givens'— or, more precisely, as culture is inevitably involved in such matters, the assumed 'givens...
Page 25 - For the preceding reasons, it is in general a necessary condition of free institutions that the boundaries of governments should coincide in the main with those of nationalities.
Page 26 - Nationalism in the West arose in an effort to build a nation in the political reality and the struggles of the present without too much sentimental regard for the past; nationalists in Central and Eastern Europe created often, out of the myths of the past and the dreams of the future, an ideal fatherland, closely linked with the past, devoid of any immediate connection with the present, and expected to become sometime a political reality.
Page 16 - One is bound to one's kinsman, one's neighbour, one's fellow believer, ipso facto; as the result not merely of personal affection, practical necessity, common interest, or incurred obligation, but at least in great part by virtue of some unaccountable absolute import attributed to the very tie itself.
Page 16 - ... virtue of some unaccountable absolute import attributed to the very tie itself. The general strength of such primordial bonds, and the types of them that are important, differ from person to person, from society to society, and from time to time. But for virtually every person, in every society, at almost all times, some attachments seem to flow more from a sense of natural — some would say spiritual — affinity than from social interaction.

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