Conflict, Negotiation and European Union Enlargement

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Cambridge University Press, 2009 - Political Science - 211 pages
Each wave of expansion of the European Union has led to political tensions and conflict. Existing members fear their membership privileges will diminish and candidates are loath to concede the expected benefits of membership. Despite these conflicts, enlargement has always succeeded - so why does the EU continue to admit new states even though current members might lose from their accession? Combining political economy logic with statistical and case study analyses, Christina J. Schneider argues that the dominant theories of EU enlargement ignore how EU members and applicant states negotiate the distribution of enlargement benefits and costs. She explains that EU enlargement happens despite distributional conflicts if the overall gains of enlargement are redistributed from the relative winners among existing members and applicants to the relative losers. If the overall gains from enlargement are sufficiently great, a redistribution of these gains will compensate losers, making enlargement attractive for all states.
 

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European Union Enlargement

Contents

Introduction
1
EU enlargements and transitional periods
12
A rationalist puzzle of EU enlargement?
33
A theory of discriminatory membership
55
EU enlargement distributional conflicts and the demand
77
The discriminatory of membership
138
Discriminatory membership and intraunion redistribution
158
Conclusion
182
Bibliography
189
Index
205
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About the author (2009)

Christina J. Schneider is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. She studies the interrelationships between international cooperation and distributional conflict on the domestic and international level with a focus on the European Union. Her work has appeared in the British Journal of Political Science, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of European Public Policy, and Public Choice.

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